Cross Country
 

F Y I ...

Team Liaison & Representative:

Melodie Naumann

Click here to sign up to volunteer in the concession stand at an at-home sport event !

37 RUNNERS = 74 HOURS !

AS OF AUGUST 13, 2014, THE BOYS CC TEAM HAS -0- ACCUMULATED VOLUNTEER  HOURS IN THE CONCESSION STAND FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR.  THIS IS 0.0% OF OUR 100% GOAL.

THANK YOU TO THE RUNNERS AND PARENTS WHO HAVE VOLUNTEERED !

DO YOU NEED TO UPDATE YOUR ATHLETIC PHYSICAL EXAM CARD (green) ?

Click here to get form to print out.

DO YOU NEED TO UPDATE YOUR ATHLETIC ALTERNATE YEAR MEDICAL CARD (brown) ?

Click here to get form to print out.

WANT TO SKIP THE BUS AND GET TRANSPORTATION ON YOUR OWN TO YOUR TEAM EVENT?

Click here to get the Independent Travel Form to print out.
NEED THE FORM FOR DICK OHM VOLUNTEER HOURS?
Click here to print out the Dick Ohm Volunteer hours form.

WELCOME to the

KMHS Boys' Cross Country webpage !

 

This site will provide you with all the information you need to know and want to find out about our team.

You will find the team coaches contact info, roster, practice info, meet schedules and locations, meet results, and photos.

Learn about our pasta parties that we have the night before a meet, or any other special happenings that we will post from time to time.

Runners can read health and training tips, and where the summer running camps will be held.  Various links will get you to where you need to find Signup Genius volunteer opportunities, as well as KMHS forms.

Keep connected with the Cross Country team.  Get acquainted with our new webpage.  We want you to stay informed of all the cross country happenings !

PURPOSE

The purpose of the boys' cross country team is to provide opportunities for learning experiences inherent in athletics that are difficult to duplicate in other school activities.  The sport teaches attitudes of responsible team play and cooperation, while providing discipline, pride in the school, and respect for teammates.

ELIGIBLE GRADES:  9 - 12

LEVELS:   JV / V

START DATE:  August 18, 2014

WINTER TRAINING FOR SUCCESS

Read the article below how to keep from over-training.

 

 

 

 

Congratulations to Sam Pausha.

Hard work really does pay off !

What a great article in the

Lake Country Reporter.

Read it here.

MEET YOUR COACHES

Head Coach, John Herod

Phone - (2)352-5822

Email - hjohn56@hotmail.com

Coach Herod has worked for the Department of Corrections as a teacher for 21 years.  He was in the US Marine Corps 1974 to 1978; discharged as a SGT.  He ran Track and CC at UWM and was a Captain of the CC team 3 years in 1980, 81, and 82.  He is married to Deb, and they have two children, Bryce 13 and Julia 11.  He has a weakness for cookies!

Assistant Coach, Mike Dussault

Phone - (2)968-6300, #4204

Email - dussaultm@kmsd.edu

Coach Dussault grew up in Antioch, IL, and attended Antioch High School.  He studied secondary education and mathematics at Ripon College.  Thoughout high school and college, Coach Dussault competed in cross country and track.

Outside of teaching and coaching, Coach Dussault enjoys the outdoors.  During the summer you can often find him out on the water jet skiing, boating, and teeing off on the golf course.  During the winter (when we get snow!) he enjoys hitting the slopes out west in Colorado and snowmobiling.  Year round he enjoys running through local forest preserves, wintry roads, and participating in road races.

THIS WEEK ...

LASER CARDS

MEN... 

GET THOSE LASER CARDS SOLD, AND THE MONEY IN TO THE ATHLETIC DEPT.  !!

Varsity runner Zach Preston makes toward another turn to the finish line at the WIAA Muskego Sectionals, October 26, 2013.

2013 TEAM ROSTER

GRADE 12 GRADE 11
CONNOR CASTELLO JOHN BRANCATO
MATT COOLEY JACK HACKMAN
JIMMY DALLMAN BO HUTCHINSON
JON DIVITO JT NAUMANN
WILL GAMROTH ZACH PRESTON
ANTHONY GASPARRI CHAYCE ROECKER
JACK HAYES NIK VAKIL
ANDY KASUN
SAM KEFER GRADE 9
TED PACHOWITZ EMMETT GALLES
SAM PAUSHA TRAVIS LUTERBACH
HUNTER REHM JOEY NEIMON
NICK 'BT' THOMAS DANE SICKINGER
RYAN WEDL JACK SMITH
JAKE WISCHSTADT ETHAN SUHR
  ZACH WESKE 
GRADE 10 BEN WONDOLKOWSKI
ADAM BREWER
MALACHI BURRIE
JACOB CAVAIANI
TONY HILDEBRANDT
CALEB HUTCHINSON
ZACH KOLB
SAM SIMON

2013 MEET SCHEDULE

EVENT

DATE

LOCATION / MAP

RACE

RESULTS

RACE

PHOTOS
PASTA PARTY

Aug.

30

DALLMAN'S --- ---
WATERTOWN INVITATIONAL

Aug.

31

WATERTOWN HIGH SCHOOL

825 Endevour Dr., Watertown

TEAM
PASTA PARTY

Sept.

4

NAUMANN'S --- ---
NATURE HILL INVITATIONAL

Sept.

5

NATURE HILL INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

850 Lake Dr., Oconomowoc

VARSITY

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

PASTA PARTY

Sept.

11

DIVITO'S --- ---
ARROWHEAD INVITATIONAL

Sept.

12

ARROWHEAD HIGH SCHOOL

700 North Ave., Hartland

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

FRESHMEN

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

FRESHMEN

PASTA PARTY

Sept.

20

WONDOLKOWSKI'S --- ---
ANGEL INVITATIONAL

Sept.

21

900 Wood St., Kenosha

VARSITY

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

PASTA PARTY

Sept.

27

WISCHSTADT'S / GAMROTH'S

--- ---
PETE NIELSEN INVITE

Sept.

28

651 State Hwy 83, Hartland

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

PASTA PARTY

Oct.

2

SICKINGER'S --- ---
MUKWONAGO INVITATIONAL

Oct.

3

MUKWONAGO COUNTY PARK

Cty Hwy LO, Mukwonago

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

PARTY PARTY

Oct.

18

PAUSHA'S --- ---
CONFERENCE MEET

Oct.

19

651 State Hwy 83, Hartland

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

FRESHMEN

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

FRESHMEN

PASTA PARTY

Oct.

23

BREWER'S --- ---
SOUTH MILWAUKEE ROCKET INVITE

Oct.

24

100 Hawthorne Ave., So. Milwaukee

JR. VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

PASTA PARTY

Oct.

25

BRANCATO'S --- ---
WIAA MUSKEGO SECTIONAL MEET

Oct.

26

W216 S10586 Crowbar Dr., Muskego

VARSITY

VARSITY

PASTA PARTY

Nov.

1

OPEN --- ---

WIAA STATE CC

CHAMPIONSHIPS

Nov.

2

2311 Griffith Ave., Wisconsin Rapids

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY

VARSITY

JR. VARSITY



FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL

CLASSIC 8 CONFERENCE ATHLETIC EVENTS,

INCLUDING LOCATION MAPS,

CLICK HERE !

Then click on "Subscribe" to get your athlete's schedule onto your home computer calendar.  Also click on "Notify me" to receive email and phone reminders, and automatic notifications of schedule changes.

CAPTAINS' CORNER  ~  10/28

 

Men,   The season turned out to be very successful. Almost everyone PRd in their final race of the season which is why we trained the way we did. It showed how all of our hard work actually paid off. With almost everybody peaking at the end of the season, it shows how much our coaches know what they are doing. I'm proud of you guys. I got a lot more laughs this season than I ever thought I would have, and I owe it all to you guys. There's a lot of potential on this team with talent spreading from the junior to freshman level. Make sure you keep representing our bolt family in a positive way. And, of course, keep training during the off season as well!  When no one is looking, Sam

 

Men,  It's been a great year.  For the most part, we had a great last race.  The JV squad had a ton of PRs at Grant Park, and a couple of the guys on Varsity PRed as well.  The season may not have gone as well as some of us had wished, but I see it as an opportunity to get motivated.  With plenty of training over the winter, we can come back as a much stronger track team.  If the younger guys work hard over the summer, we may even have a stronger team than we did this year.  So keep on running those miles of smiles, and you'll be much happier when the next season comes rolling around.   ~ Jimmy

 

Great way to finish the season bolts! JV only had three people not PR on Thursday and shows that all the hard work pays off. On the varsity side also having a pretty good day with almost everyone running a PR or close to one. Unfortunate for Sam, having to end there, but we still have track. Great Season Bolts!    When no ones looking, Wedl

 

Gentlemen, by the performance the JV had last week Thursday, I'd say it is a great way to end a season!  And by the reactions I got from you guys really tells me you all love that course.  big PRs from a lot of guys!  Nice job from Hackman, Smith, and Simon who battled it out to the finish.  It shows we'll have some great times next year and in the coming track season!  I'm proud of all of you.  Even though we didn't always get the results we wanted, we still tried our best and had some fun!  BOOM-CHUCKA-LUCKA!   JT

Varsity, first off let me say that it was a pleasure to run with you guys this season!!  Saturday was windy and chilly.  I think its fair to say that most of you ran very well!  Congrats to Zach and Tony on more PRs and to finish in the 18s!  Just the start of your KM varsity careers!  Sam had nothing short of an off day, but he pushed hard and held off for the last 5K of his career.  Our results didn't always show how much hard work and dedication we put in this season, but we always had a good time!  Good luck in the track season guys.  Another year of cross country has come and gone.  BOOM-CHUCKA-LUCKA !!   JT

CC LASERS PASTA PARTIES !

Pasta Party prep ideas

Typically, the night before a meet, the team gathers together to load up on carbohydrates and have some fun.  These are great bonding experiences for the athletes.  The party is hosted by a teammate's parent who signs up to host, and makes the boys some pasta.

See the calendar above for Pasta Party dates and locations.  Click on the above pasta picture to see some helpful Pasta Party suggestions.

Why Cross Country?

When there are other sports that seem more fun, why would I want to put myself through the sweat, soreness, and pain of long distance running?

  • Build confidence by getting in real shape
  • Run and hang out with some good guys
  • Be part of a team
  • Everyone gets to compete
  • The feeling of accomplishment
  • Meet some KM students before school starts

What kind of team and coaches does KM have?

Our goal is to be the best we can be as individuals through consistent running at a level that we can handle. We want to improve our fitness and times as the months, races, and years go by. We also want to improve and gain friendships, push ourselves to our limit, and make sure that everyone gets our support and appreciation for their efforts.

Any young man that will show up at practice and try their best will be accepted and encouraged by us all. We don’t put each other down we try to lift you up. You would become part of the “Bolt” family. We also invite your own family to be a part of our great sport with which ever amount of support and involvement that they can. Trust that if Mom, Dad, Brother, Sister, Grandparent, friend come to a meet, they will see a very fun, excited, and supportive team. Our hearts are not just in the running. As your coach I am very proud to see most of our runners return to watch the meets years after they have graduated. The guys tell me that the team, friends, and experience will always be an important part of their growth and life.

A MESSAGE FROM COACH HEROD

The 5 Bolts of Laser CC Success

1.  PEOPLE

Some suggest that 80 to 90% of my happiness hinges upon whom I spend time with (and how I spend it with them).  It is not cars, houses, boats, or even our x-Box 360.  It's people.  Who do we spend the most time with?  how do we treat those that we are with?  How are we treated by them?  If I am part of a family/team etc., am I there to contribute something positive?  Do I build up or tear down those that are close to me?  One of life's natural laws states that we truly value only whom (or what) we choose to hang out with.  Those around you have a profound effect on who you are or become.  Do I fly with the eagles or waddle with the toads?  Healthy relationships have laughter and love !

2.  HARD WORK

Nothing meaningful ever came from "easy"!  Why?  Because it's the intrinsic and invisible quality of character that can only come from the struggles, trials, and tribulations of our life.  At the end of or during a depression, or recession, who will bounce back first?  A man or woman that was 'given stuff', let off easy, coddled, etc.?  Or would we put more trust in one who was taught that a better man did his own wash, wrote his own term papers, or did his own push-ups?  When your teacher, Mom, Dad, coach, has expectations of you that at times feels like a 'pain', they are contributing to your character.  they are helping you build a foundation of toughness and strength that will last a lifetime.  We see personal power in you here at KM, and not someone wanting to 'hold out a cup'.

3.  MEANING

Why am I here?  If I have a clear idea about where I am going most of the time, I have more peace of mind.  If I know why I run, study, do chores, take this class, hang with this person, speak this or that way, I will be more content.  I am focused, not a leaf blowing in the wind, or a rudderless ship.  Similar to goals, I am strong because I choose events, challenges, careers, etc.  This self-knowledge and control over my outer as well as inner life contributes to my identity and maybe a more enduring happiness.  This search for meaning and happiness often starts on the inside.

4.  HUMILITY

In my time on this earth, I have yet to meet anyone that walks on water.  When we hear about someone that talks a little too much about themselves, are we not suspicious of their self-esteem?  As great or dominant or successful as I think I am, there will come a day or two when it all goes wrong.  The fall is much longer and more difficult without the quality of humility.  This is a common trait of high achievers, and often demonstrated by those we like and look up to.  It is also a quality that draws people toward us.  Maybe it is because we all will need an ear or shoulder at some time in our life.  Many of us have already fallen and gotten back up.  I'll bet that our friends and family were there to lend a hand.  Don't mistake humility, however, with someone void of confidence.  To be able to laugh at oneself actually demonstrates a higher level of confidence.  Many examples of confident humility are here at KM.

5.  LOVE

The more we make decisions based on love, the fewer mistakes we will make in a happy life.  This is the natural order in healthy relationships.  And again, doesn't our happiness ultimately depend on the quality of our relationships?

EATING RIGHT FOR DISTANCE AND COMPETITION

Introduction

Parents often ask questions regarding when and what to feed their sons and daughters prior to distance runs and competitions.  It’s understandable that parents and athletes might be confused about the appropriate foods to serve and when they should be provided.  There’s a plethora of literature available addressing appropriate diets for health and fitness.  However, while many of these writings target the nutritional aspects of the diet, few take into consideration the pre-workout or pre-competition aspects of the athletes’ diet.

In this writing, I’ll focus more on which foods to eat and which foods to avoid, and when to provide these, in order to optimize performance.  I’ll avoid going down the road of general nutritional advice, assuming that most of our parents have a good handle on what is healthy and what’s unhealthy.  However, I will touch on the “food group” basics to provide a foundation for the discussion to follow.

The difficulty for a distance runner lies in striking the critical balance between ingesting enough of the nutrients required to fuel and generate energy while avoiding the mistake of having too much food in the stomach when approaching an event.  Whether running a workout or running in competition, the athlete is better served having as little food remaining in the digestive tract as possible.  The old saying, “the hungry dog fights best” certainly applies to distance runners.  The problem with having food in the digestive system is two fold; first, the action of running causes a jarring to the body which stirs up food remnants and can lead to gastrointestinal problems.  Second, the process of digesting food diverts blood from the major muscle groups (in order to assist in the digestive process).  This detour of blood robs the muscles of critical oxygen and nutrients required in the generation of energy.  Therefore, the key to optimization lies in finding a means to provide the body with nutrients while at the same time minimizing the amount of food in the digestive tract prior to running.

The Basics

Effective and efficient distance running demands that the body is properly fueled.  The following nutrients are necessary in order for the body to efficiently convert fuel to energy:

Proteins (builds muscle, secondary as a fuel for energy)

Carbohydrates (provides the most efficient fuel)

Minerals (especially magnesium, potassium, sodium)

Vitamins (essential in daily function and assist in conversion of fuel to energy)

Water (important in the cooling process and assist in the conversion of fuel to energy)

Oxygen (basic in sustaining life, but also required in the conversion of fuel to energy)

Fat (needed in limited quantity, secondary as a fuel for energy)

Proteins are important in cell replacement and the building of muscles.  We all need adequate supplies of protein for every day life; athletes need additional protein to repair damaged tissue and build strength.  Proteins can also provide fuel for the generation of energy.  However, the human body prefers carbohydrates and then (secondly) fats for the energy cycle. Using protein to generate fuel is less efficient than burning carbohydrates or fats.  Complex proteins can take up to 48 hours to fully digest and therefore large volumes of these proteins should be avoided as you approach a workout and especially prior to competition.  Therefore, you may want to target dinner as the meal to provide the larger volumes of proteins.  Breakfast can also be used to supply moderate portions of proteins.   Some examples of high protein foods include (but are not limited to); meats, poultry, fish, dairy products, beans, lentils, and legumes.

Carbohydrates provide the primary source of energy for moderate and prolonged exercise.  Of all foods, carbohydrates are the most easily digested and most economically converted to glycogen which is the raw fuel used to power the human engine.  Having glycogen readily available in the bloodstream is key in providing energy for running distances over 300 meters.  Carbohydrates should therefore be considered as an important component of meals leading up to competitions.  In addition, since carbohydrates are easily digested, this is the preferred food group to be consumed as the athlete approaches competition.  Examples of food high in carbohydrates include (but are not limited to); grains, cereals, potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, many vegetables, fruits, cakes, crackers, and cookies, etc)

Water, vitamins and minerals are all extremely important to the athletes’ performance.  Although these do not provide the substance for energy, they facilitate the process.  It’s important that each athlete consume adequate quantities of minerals, vitamins and water.  Special attention should be provided to the intake of water throughout the day, especially in the warmer months.  Athletes need to focus on drinking water often and throughout the day.  Consistent and continual consumption of minerals and vitamins is also important.  While running distances, it’s important that the athlete does not restrict food intake without consulting a doctor or dietician.  Foods are the most effective source of minerals and vitamins.  Rather than restricting food intake, the athlete in training should look at what types of foods to consume and the quality of those food products.

Meals for Training

Ideally, lunch should be light and eaten early enough in the day to allow items to be partially digested.  Attempt to eat foods made up primarily of carbohydrates (pastas, sandwiches, rice).  Some meats are more difficult to digest than others.  Red meats are the most difficult to digest; therefore the athlete should avoid large portions of beef or other red meats.   If meat is to be consumed at lunch, foul is preferred.  Moderate portions of chicken or turkey can be digested easier than heavier meats and are less likely to cause distress.  Avoid spicy dishes and vegetables (onions, peppers, radishes, etc).  Each athlete is different; some runners can eat foods that others couldn’t image eating.  I’ve known runners who could eat fairly large meals up to an hour before exercising.  Use discretion and find a routine that works for an athletes’ individual preference.

Many athletes discover an intolerance for certain foods prior to workouts.  A couple of the foods that a runner is most likely to struggle with include; dairy products, acidic fruit juices.

Some workouts are also more intense than others and the athlete needs to keep this in mind while selecting his or her lunch fare.  On those days where we run interval workouts, the athlete will want to be extra careful not to eat too much and should avoid those meals that are known not to sit well, i.e., Chipotle burritos.  However, athletes who eat a light, early lunch may find themselves getting a little hungry in the early afternoon.  A light snack an hour or so before practice shouldn’t interfere with their ability to perform, assuming that the snack consist of appropriate foods.  Crackers make a perfect pre-workout snack.  Avoid proteins, spicy foods and foods with high sugar content as you approach the workout.

Dinner should be a complete meal addressing all of the runners’ nutritional requirements.  Since proteins are often avoided in the hours leading up to a workout, dinner time is the perfect time to address this need.

Breakfast is another opportunity to provide any of the nutrients that the runner may need or crave.  It strongly advised that the athlete in training eat a substantial, nutritious breakfast, especially on those days where the lunch needs to be light.  Since breakfast is served about nine hours prior to the workout, it’s not as important that the runner avoid specific foods.  Unfortunately, this doesn’t apply on race day.

Meals Leading Up to Competition

Preparation for competition is very much like preparing for a workout, just slightly exaggerated.  Preparation for a race will begin at least 24 hours ahead of the event.  In preparing the pre-race dinner, it’s not so much what you eat, as it is what you shouldn’t eat.  When preparing for competition the runner should begin limiting the amount of protein consumed during the day prior the race.  An absence of protein assures that the digestive tract will be relatively empty at the time of competition.  In lieu of meats, gear meals towards potatoes, pastas, breads and vegetables.

In the 1970s marathoners began a ritual called “carbohydrate loading”.  This is a process where, in the days proceeding a race, the runner gorges on pastas, breads and other carbohydrates in an effort to load the body with carbohydrates and saturate the bloodstream with glycogen.  Carbohydrate loading has since become an important preparatory routine for marathoners and ultra marathoners.  The technique has additionally been adopted by middle and long distance runners, even though athletes running distances shorter than 10 miles are unlikely to benefit from carbohydrate loading.   What these runners do benefit from is that fact that they’ve consumed meals that are low in protein.   Given this scenario, the blood stream will be loaded with glycogen and an empty digestive tract will limit the likelihood that he or she will suffer from gastrointestinal problems.

Other (day before) dinner foods that runners find to be beneficial include; salads, mild vegetables and fruits (with low acidity).

In preparing the pre-race breakfast, again try to avoid serving proteins.  But don’t go overboard; stay practical.  For instance, a little milk in a bowl of cereal is not likely to cause any problems.  However, carbohydrates are preferred.  Lean towards serving toast, cereals, pancakes, waffles, etc.  Avoid large consumption of milk or highly acidic juices.  Drinks like water, tea, grape juice or sports drinks are safer.

If the athlete is competing in a morning event, strive to serve breakfast at least 3 hours prior to the start of the competition and don’t over eat.

Some people have gained the false impression that if the stomach is empty, then the athlete doesn’t have fuels to aid in competition.  This is absolutely false.  The fuels used in today’s competition were consumed yesterday.

The pre-race lunch should be light and consist of foods that are easily digested and unlikely to cause gastro-intestinal problems.   Avoid steaks and other meats, beans, onions, peppers, curry and vegetables that could cause heartburn.  Seek out potatoes, breads and pastas.  Also avoid milk and acidic juices (like orange and grapefruit).  Tea, some juices and sports drinks are preferred.

As competition nears, some athletes feel uncomfortable with an empty stomach.  A pre-race snack is not necessary and does little to benefit the athlete, other than making them feel less hungry.  But if the athlete feels a pre-race snack is needed, stick to breads, crackers or low sugar cookies.  These digest easily and are less likely to cause problems.

Be careful to limit consumption of sugar over final two hours prior to the start of the race.

Summary

Timing is everything.   Essential for the distance runner is the need to feel comfortable while competing or training.  In order to be comfortable, the runner needs to have a reasonably empty stomach.  Therefore, work hard to time meals to meet the needs of the athlete, but optimize performance by minimizing what’s in the stomach at the time of a workout and/or meet.

The distance runner has special needs.  Distance running takes high energy.  Fuels are derived primarily from consumption of carbohydrates.  However if carbohydrates are unavailable the body resorts first to burning fats and then to protein.

Distance training also breaks down and re-builds muscle tissue.  Protein is essential in this process.  Also essential are fluids, vitamins and minerals.  Therefore a distance runner needs to consume enough of the right foods to assure that all of these needs are address.  Supplements such as multiple vitamins, minerals and/sports drinks might also assist in assuring that these needs are addressed.  However, take care that supplements are consumed in moderation.

A balanced diet that provides all of the nutritional elements required by the distance runner is paramount.  Avoid carbonated beverages and foods high in processed sugars and sweeteners.

SAFE RUNNING !

CC RACE SCORING

There are usually seven (7) runners from each team that score in a race.  Some meets score the lowest combined time of the top five (5) runners.  We do this at our home Laser/Nielson Invitational meet at NagaWaukee Park.  The JV race has an unlimited amount of runners, but just score the top seven (7) from each team.  When all of the runners finish, the officials (from what is now mostly automatic/electric timing) will score the top five (5) from each team.  Each runner gets a number, and the lowest top five (5) scores from each team will win, or take 2nd, 3rd, and so on.

THE MEETS ... INFO FOR PARENTS

Before a race, it is a good idea to get acquainted with the course by finding the spectator points and the start and finish lines.  There may be as few as two or as many as six races during the day.  So be sure to check the time of your son's race in the weekly newsletter from the Coach.

It is normal during the days leading up to a meet that your son may get a bit cranky and nervous, and for some this is to be expected.  Also, at the meet itself, you can expect your son to be wrapped up in the task at hand and will probably not pay too much attention to his parents as he will be highly nervous and will need to get mentally and physically prepared.  Most often he will hang with his team and coaches.  To watch a race, you may want to see the start.  After that, you may move to different points along the course to cheer and watch.  As the race develops, you may choose to move to the finish to see the exciting conclusion.  After a race, the runners will catch their breath for a few minutes then walk back to the tent and put on their trainers to do a 10 to 20 minutes cool down run.  The boys will also want to cheer on their teammates in the next race.  As runners are finishing a race, they will be physically spent and may show:  rubbery legs, physical weakness, exhaustion, glassy eyes, nausea, extra saliva.  These symptoms will pass quickly and you are not to worry.  After all the races are completed, there is usually an awards ceremony which we attend as a team.  We would appreciate it if the runners and families could stay until the meet is over in support of all teammates; however, we do understand that there are some family obligations.

As the season develops, your son will experience many highs and lows emotionally that can relate to his running.  If he is successful and meets his goals such as a PERSONAL RECORD (PR), or a race that is high in his/coaches' minds, a high team finish, he will be content.  Sometimes it doesn't turn out as well as planned.  This is when they need their trusted teammates, family, and coaches the most, with encouragement.  Some runners need more alone time, and that is okay too.  Whatever the case, we always support their efforts.

It is important to remember that in CC at KMHS, we do not cut athletes from the team.  Any young man who shows up to practice every day, puts on a Laser uniform, tries hard, and is respectful of others ... deserves our respect and support.  This is really all we expect.  Every Laser then is a winner !

 

SUPPORT ...  An organized group of parents is a tremendous help to any program, but none more important than in the sport of CC.  Active involvement with our team gives everybody a feeling of unity and purpose.  In no other sport is there more of a family close knit atmosphere than in the sport of CC.  We also sometimes are not publicized to the extent that other sports are, in and out of the school atmosphere.  So we need your encouragement all the more.

Some runners will seem detached from family at times saying that they make them too nervous.  Parents, you deserve to be a part of your son's life experiences and we encourage our young runners to communicate with their family about their life.  A little pressure, with support, is okay.

When possible, parents can also assist in the publicity and promotion of our team.  Please shout from the rooftops, call the press, jump up and down.  Our Laser runners and the sport of CC deserves to be covered and talked about too !

Thank you for your support of your athlete !

WINTER TRAINING FOR SUCCESS

800 to 3200

 

When I start running again, how do I keep from over-training?

Most sophomores, juniors, and seniors with at least one full year of urnning experience (a track and a CC season) can build up to 40 to 60 miles per week by early November (frosh up to 35 to 45).  This 40 to 60 per week that you have gradually built up to, will be work much better if you pay attention to the following:

  1. Build your weekly miles gradually.  follow this program starting by no later than arly June.
  2. No more than two hard workouts per week.  A 'hard' workout is considered a long run 60 minutes or more, a tempo, or a track repeat workout.  One or two per week is enough.  See average week examples.
  3. the 'hard' workouts should be done no more than 85% effort  *i.e., if during the season you were able to run 8x400 averaging 80 seconds, you would run the same workout at about 85 sec. average.  If you average about 6:30 pace for a 3 mile tempo, a tempo at 7 pace is enough.
  4. Easy days should out-number hard days by about 3 to 4 easy days to 1 hard.
  5. Dont run the longer runs hard.  I have persoally destroyed my own season by hammering too much on long runs.  Build miles first.  When out on a run and you feel good, it's OK to 'go with it' a little, but then you need 2 to 3 days when you make sure that you keep your pace under control.
  6. Tempo (threshold) runs are no faster than about 60 to 90 seconds slower than your best Mile PR.  We have a good number of guys under 5 for a mile.  Tempo for you will be about 6 flat to 6:30 per mile pace.  A one or two mile tempo in early January and 2 to 3 mile tempo by early March.
  7. If you are tired 3 or more days in a row, take a day off and call coach and/or your doctor.
  8. When in doubt, the weekly miles total is more important than any specific workouts.  The priority should be 1) miles  2) tempo  3) repeats.
  9. Two per day runs.  This will greatly allow you to get the miles in safer.  Spread out the pounding on your body.  It also adds to your commitment and resolve.
  10. If you want to be your best, make the sacrifice and get out there.
  11. Drink lots of wate rand/or fluids that your body is comfortable with.
  12. Make plans to run with your Bolt teammates.

 

What type of training is best for CC runners?

In general, more miles (if you recover), tempo, and persistence, will contribute to a great race day for you.
 
How much can I expect to improve if I train properly?
In high school, more time drops happen with frosh and sophs.  But many great junior and senior racing years have also been accomplished by those dedicated athletes that take their training safely to the next level.  Performance tables that I have factored over time have 9th and 10th graers running about 0.95 to 0.96 faster, and 11th and 12th graders 0.96 to 0.97 faster on average  (i.e.,  a 5:20 mile as a frosh with a good amount of training will improve at 0.95 to a 5:01 mile and a 2:20 800 runner at 0.96 might expec to run 2:14 as a second year runner.  A 5 flat miler at 0.96 improves to 4:48 as a 3rd year high school runner.  Look familiar?  If you train regular, do some math for yourself.  Most of these predictors depend on your dedication and getting out there .... when no one is looking.
 
Cold weather?
Bundle up and get out there.  run early in the day.  run late in teh day.  Run twice per day.  Don't run too hard in the cold.  Plan ahead and run lots more miles when it's less cool and a little elss when it's too oppressive.  Go to the Pettit National Ice Center where they have a beautiful 450 track at about 55 degrees.
 
Summer specific workouts.
As long as the miles come first.  Alternate.   1,2, or 3 mile tempo, 2x mile at about 60 sec. slower than recent mile PR,  12 x 200 at about 1600 PR race pace, 8 x 40s, at about recent 2 mile race pace,  4 x 800 at about 5K race pace.  DO NOT RED LINE.  Save your big efforts for more miles per week (recovered) and the track season.
 
Typical week by late November:
First and second year runners at the low end and 3rd and 4th year runners at the higher end.  20 to 30 miles per week and 1 hard workout;  long run 6 to 7 miles.
 
December:
30 to 45 miles per week and 1 hard workout.  Start 1 or 2 two per day runs; long run 6 - 8 miles.
35 to 50 miles per week and 1 hard workout.  Long run 8 to 10 miles.
35 to 50 miles per week and 1 hard workout.  Long run 9 to 10 miles, and 2 to 3 two per day runs.
 
January / February:
45 to 55 miles per week and 1 hard workout.  Long run 10 to 12 miles; 3 to 4 two per day runs.
45 to 60 miles per week and 1 hard workout.  Long run 10 to 12 miles; 3 to 4 two per day runs.
 
Early March is first day of track practice.   Be ready for greatness !